Bargain brand vs brand names

Email The security of buying a name brand product may cost you a little extra, but is it worth it when the generic or store brand version of the same item is sitting right there on the store or supermarket shelf?

Bargain brand vs brand names

Send this info to a friend To: Check this box if you wish to have a copy mailed to you. See our privacy policy. A A Our tests pit private-label products against big-name rivals Consumer Reports magazine: In comparing store-brand and name-brand versions of 19 products, our savings ranged from 5 percent frozen lasagna to 60 percent ice cream.

10 Cheap Generic Brands That Are Exactly Like the Brand Name. than the brand names we're so loyal to. "One secret of store brands -- or 'private label' brands with seemingly bargain quality. 20 CVS brand products vs. national brands. Whenever possible, I opt for the generic or store brand over the national brand to save money. There are a few brand-name items I pay extra for, but in most cases, it’s what’s inside the bottle that counts. Welcome to Bargain Babe! I’m Mara, and I’m so glad you’re here. I am an. Jan 22,  · But times are tough these days, and since generic cereals offer nearly double the amount of sugary goodness at a fraction of the cost, we decided to compare them to their brand .

Many of those store brands were also as tasty as the alternative. Our sensory experts found that the store brand and name brand tied in 10 cases, the name brand won in eight cases, and the store brand won once.

Two products might have ingredients of similar quality—good, bad, or in between—but taste very different because those ingredients differ. A case in point: National brands produce and package a wide variety of store-brand products.

Among the many big names known to make store brands are Hormel canned meats, bouillon, and dessertsMarcal paper towels, tissues, and napkinsMcCain french fries, appetizers, and frozen pizzaand Reynolds foil, plastic wrap and bags, and disposable plates and cups.

Nor is there any guarantee that national brands simply slap different labels on products rolling off the same assembly line. Store-brand products might be made to different specifications. Store brands are here to stay Almost 24 percent of supermarket products are store brands, according to the Private Label Manufacturers Association.

Almost two-thirds of shoppers surveyed in May and June by the management consulting company Accenture said that their grocery carts were at least half full of store-brand products. In tough economic times, shoppers are naturally drawn to cheaper brands. But private label is not a flash in the pan, says Matt Arnold, a senior consumer analyst with Edward Jones, an investment company based in St.

Consumers have more store-brand choices, too, as retailers tap into product categories that lack clear national-brand leaders. Publix, for example, sells dozens of organic foods under its own brand; Costco sells Kirkland Signature bourbon, Greek yogurt, and green tea; Price Chopper sells its own gelati and an extensive line of mustards.

But with those fancier store brands and a current rise in the cost of commodities, exacerbated by drought, the price gap between store brands and name brands could be narrowing. A recent poll of retailers by Supermarket News found that store-brand price increases are outpacing those of national brands.

National brands also have more invested in research and development, packaging, advertising, and marketing, so ingredients represent a smaller slice of their cost.

In blind tests, our trained tasters evaluated 19 pairs of staple foods. Based on our test—in which national brands and store brands tied 10 times; national brands won eight times; store brands, once—store brands are often at least as good as national brands and usually cost much less.

So give store brands a try.

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Your taste buds might be happy; your wallet certainly will be. Costs below are based on the average prices our shoppers paid.

Bargain brand vs brand names

For that story, our reporter shopped for the same basic products in four ways: Store-brand winner Giant Eagle 52 cents per serving is a simple, mild broth with a slight taste of roasted chicken. They are of about equal though imperfect quality.

Meijer 37 cents per serving is very tart—more sour than sweet. Both contain juices from other fruits, such as grape and apple. Both are chewy and have nuts, raisins, and dried cranberries.

Even for our experts, it was hard to tell these two apart. Both are fine choices. Skippy 20 cents per serving is a bit sweeter and slightly more bitter than Wegmans 15 cents per servingwhich has more of a roasted impression.

They are of about the same quality, but they taste different.Deciding on brand name vs. generic When it comes to deciding whether to buy generic products or brand name, I usually go generic if the product is a regulated commodity.

Bargain Brand vs.. Brand Name Introduction In this lab the main purpose was to research for a company that made bargain brand products to see if college students equally like bargain bands to name brands. The experiment that was preformed was based solely on the taste of the products.

To be sure the only thing [ ]. Jan 22,  · But times are tough these days, and since generic cereals offer nearly double the amount of sugary goodness at a fraction of the cost, we decided to compare them to their brand .

Bargain Brand vs.. Brand Name Introduction In this lab the main purpose was to research for a company that made bargain brand products to see if college students equally like bargain bands to . 10 Cheap Generic Brands That Are Exactly Like the Brand Name.

Bargain brand vs brand names

than the brand names we're so loyal to. "One secret of store brands -- or 'private label' brands with seemingly bargain quality. Trade big brands for store brands and you’ll save big bucks—an average of 25 percent, according to industry experts. In comparing store-brand and name-brand versions of 19 products, our.

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